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12
Feb

Mark, Set…Go! 40 for 40


As a celebration for Mark Weikert turning forty years old on April 8, 2015, he plans on running 40 miles on that day to raise money for The Collaborative.  Mark is currently the Health and Physical Education teacher at Flood Brook School.  He has been teaching for 18 years with the past 10 years at Flood Brook School.   He works for The Collaborative recently the EDP Director and Camp Director.

Mark’s has a history of endurance events for fun and competition. He ran 20 on his 20th birthday and 30 on his 30th birthday.  He has completed the Ironman triathlon in Lake Placid (Swim 2.6 bike 112 run 26.2 miles) and over 10 marathons (26.2 miles) including The Boston Marathon 4 times.

Weikert has been teaching goal setting during his Physical Education lessons all year.  He has been using his goal and training for this 40 mile run as an example of how long some goals take and that physical fitness can not happen over night. Mark started training the week of thanksgiving 2014 for a 22 week training schedule to get from zero miles a week to over 60 miles a week.  As part of his training, he has recently been running to school every morning to also help demonstrate the time committed it takes to train for an event like this.  You may see him running 10 miles at 4:30am on his way from Bondville to Londonderry.  Mark also stresses the importance of personal goals, even ones with only rewards for oneself, meaning no trophy at the end.

Mark plans to run 40 miles around the mountain town starting at 8:00 am on April 8th at Flood Brook School. If he maintains 9-minute per mile pace, he will be finished by 2:00pm.  Mark will loop passed Flood Brook a few times so the students can see how he is doing.  The students and staff will be challenged that day to get outside a run as well.  He will be challenging each class in the school to run 40 miles that day while he is running.

Mark’s goal is to raise $4,000.00 for the Collaborative These fund grants money to enrichment activities for students of the Mountain towns.  If you are interested in sponsoring Mark, please go to https://thecollaborative.wufoo.com/forms/mark-setgo/ or email chrissy@thecollaborative.us

 

28
Jan

What Signifies Adulthood?


As adults, our responsibility is to show kids that alcohol doesn’t have to be a part of the teenage years and that alcohol doesn’t signify adulthood.

Underage Drinking: Feeling Like a Grown-Up

By Todd Kestin

You probably don’t need any stats to know that many teenagers drink alcohol. But just in case, here you go. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, about 50 percent of teenagers have had at least one drink by the time they turn 15. And that number increases to 70 percent by the time they reach 18.

No!

But here’s what the stats can’t answer: why do teenagers start drinking at all? Many experts will tell you that peer pressure is the number one reason for underage drinking. And, yes, some teens do fall prey to this. Peers can be relentless when they want others to conform to their standards. But in my years working with teens, I’ve come to believe that the number one reason teens start drinking is simple: they want to feel grown up.

Around age 16, teens hit the point when they don’t see themselves as kids anymore. They begin to realize that adulthood is fast approaching and they are impatient. They are anxious to become more mature and to be seen as more mature.

Unfortunately, for many teens, alcohol has become a sign of adulthood. Our job is to show them alternatives.

When a teenager has guidance and mentorship in an environment where they are treated like an adult, massive changes begin to occur. With the proper support, these teens realize they don’t need alcohol to live in their best state possible. They need healthy relationships to begin the process of growing up. Then they can begin to adjust their lives towards what is possible, and they make the choice to start living grown up, in a healthy way.

I’ve come to believe that the number one reason teens start drinking is simple: they want to feel grown up.
Unfortunately not all teens are lucky enough to have guidance from parents or other mentors. Some teens struggle mentally, emotionally, and physically. They feel lost, grasping to make sense out of their lives. They want to feel grown up, yet they still feel like a child. For many, that’s when they turn to alcohol.

In my own practice, I am working with a 16-year-old highly anxious boy who has been masking his anxiety with alcohol. He is extremely intelligent, but his joy for school has been vanishing, and his grades have been falling. In our meetings, he talks about the pressures to drink and how it is affecting his life. He struggles with wanting to feel both grown up and like a teenager. While he says that drinking did not bring much value to his life, he continued because of his social group and to ease his anxiety. He wanted meaningful connections with people who mattered and felt that drinking would help him accomplish that goal.

Over the next several months I was able to work with him to establish his identity without the presence of alcohol in his life. We established the following goals:

Surrounding himself with the right people. Not the ones that set him back.
Setting clear goals. What does he wants moving forward in his life?
Building confidence. And listening to his intuition.
Engaging with his parents on a more mature level.
Teens simply want to feel grown up, and there are certainly ways you can foster that feeling. As you facilitate your teen’s path to independence, let him know that you are always there to help and support him. Loosen your grip on the reins, and let him make some decisions on his own. You can ask him if he wants advice, but be willing to withhold if he says he doesn’t want it. Affirm his good decisions and keep the lines of communication open.

Have discussions about preparing for life as an adult. Offer suggestions to help with the transition, like perhaps getting a part-time job, saving money, planning for college, and so on.

You can also have a heart-to-heart when it comes to underage drinking. Assure your son or daughter that they are actually acting more responsibly when they turn down alcohol than if they were to drink. Start to establish a strong relationship that is built on trust. When your teen sees you as her trusted advisor, she’ll be more likely to come to you when she has a real concern about a tough issue. When she trusts you, you’ll have a chance to guide her through adolescence and into emerging adulthood.

Todd KestinTodd Kestin, LCSW, is the author of the 7 Qualities of Incredible Teens and specializes in working with young adults.

- See more at: http://yourteenmag.com

27
Jan

Counter Balance VT Stands up to Big Tobacco


How are tobacco companies marketing to our VT youth? Kathy O’Reilly from Vermont Department of Health-Bennington and The Collaborative break down the marketing efforts of tobacco companies that target VT youth and discuss VT Department of Health’s campaign called Counter Balance VT!

22
Jan

NEW DATE for Family Fun Night


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22
Jan

Broomball Fun at Riley Rink


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19
Jan

Are vapes good, bad or in between?

This article, published in the Bennington Banner 1/16/15, looks at E-cigs and vaping. Thank you Keith Whitcomb for reaching out to The Collaborative and for writing an informed article.

Vapes become more popular, but raise questions among professionals

By Keith Whitcomb Jr.

kwhitcomb@ benningtonbanner.com @kwhitcombjr on Twitter

POSTED:   01/16/2015 03:53:51 PM EST

E-cigarettes, or vapes, are growing in popularity… (Tim Ireland — The associated press)

BENNINGTON >> More smokers are trading in their cigarettes for “vape” products, but claims they can be used to quit nicotine altogether have not been proven. Still, the products are becoming more popular.

When Ed Dublois bought the Beverage Den and Smoke Shop on North Street in Bennington, Vt., a little over a year ago, E-cigarette products were already being sold.

“But not to the magnitude we have now, there was just a very small sampling,” Dublois said. “We’ve expanded the department, so to speak, probably 5,000 to 10,000 percent.”

When the products first started to become available, “E-cigarette” was the term many were using, but because the devices use vapor the term “vape” is more common. He said there are three main vape products one can buy. Vape pens, which take “juices,” can be bought for about $25. There are other devices, called “E-hookahs,” that are disposable after a few hundred “hits.”

E-cigarettes, themselves, are the size of a normal cigarette and the vapors come in menthol flavor and different levels of nicotine.

“Some manufacturers will offer those down to no nicotine, as well,” he said.

The juices for the vape pens come in almost any flavor one can think of. People can also buy juices with varying levels of nicotine.

“What’s good about that is, if you have someone who’s a full-time cigarette smoker, they can get a vape product and start out with the normal nicotine level, then you can notch down, and go down to zero. Now, it’s all-natural fruit juices with water vapor.”

He said many of the people buying these products say that is the main reason they are switching.

It’s this ability to control the level of nicotine that appears to be the source of one of the main controversies surrounding the product, that being: Can it be used as a tool to quit smoking?

The Food and Drug Administration has not approved any of these products for that use, said Victoria Silsby, tobacco coordinator for The Collaborate, a private non-profit group serving the Northshire that works to reduce substance abuse in youth. Because the FDA has not approved vape products as quitting tools, no group such as hers will recommend them for that. Moreover, the marketing being done for them seems heavily geared toward getting people to take up nicotine use, not put it down, she said.

Dublois said another reason people are switching from cigarettes to vape is the cost. A starter kit being a one-time expense, the juice containers run about $10 each. Depending on how heavily a person uses the vape product, one container can last as long as one or two cartons of cigarettes would. A carton being $80 each, the savings is significant.

The Beverage Den plans to expand its selection even further in the coming weeks, all because of customer demand.

The industry itself is growing and changing quickly, Dublois said. “Every couple of weeks, we’re hearing something new about something slightly different coming out.”

One of the most popular vape juices, he said, is from Vermont Vapor, a company based in Castleton, Vt.

“There are some kids who are going to start smoking,” Dublois said. “We’d rather they didn’t, but there are some that are just going to start smoking. The only shining light that exists is the fact there is a product here, and I don’t think anyone is going to profess to say this is healthy, like eating an organic apple or something, but compared to cigarettes? This is a much more sensible alternative.”

He said his store only carries products made in the United States. “And that’s key, because there’s a lot made in China and it’s not as regulated.”

Collette Dublois, co-owner of The Beverage Den, said the uncertainty about what regulations the FDA will impose has also driven a reliance on American-made products.

She said many of the people buying vapes are switching from cigarettes, but some are new to nicotine products entirely.

Silsby said nicotine gum and patches come with FDA-approved guidelines on how wean oneself off nicotine. Vape products do not, and the concern is people looking to quit are just replacing one addiction behavior with another. She said there is also little scientific data on how safe the vapor being inhaled actually is, both for the user and those experiencing it second-hand.

Maryann Morris, of the Collaborative, said while there has been anecdotal evidence of people quitting using vapes, there have been no solid studies showing they work for that purpose. She said the Collaborative wants people to quit using whatever works, but until more is known, they do not support vape products and are concerned the alleged benefits will draw young people toward nicotine.

Jim Carroll of Bennington said he was sent an E-cigarette for Christmas and the main reason he had switched has been cost.

“Smoking was just becoming too expensive,” he said.

Carroll said he smoked two, sometimes three, packs per day, his brand costing more than $6 per pack.

“The savings has been undeniable,” he said.

Carroll said he does not use the E-cigarette as much as he smoked, and feels it has done something to alleviate cravings. Before, he would wake up in the middle of the night to smoke a cigarette. He still wakes up, but more often than not forgoes using the E-cigarette.

While he does not think the product is healthy, and the vapor makes him cough more than cigarette smoke did, overall he feels better.

Contact Keith Whitcomb Jr. at 802-447-7567, Ext. 115.

8
Jan

Martin Luther King Jr Day

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6
Jan

What Heroin Addiction Tells Us About Changing Bad Habits

A perspective on how to successfully break bad habits by looking at addiction.

28
Dec

This is Your Brain on Drugs


An article printed in the New York Times October 29, 2014.
What to consider if your teen uses…
1) THC mean levels have risen 10% since 1995
2) THC content varies from 8% to 70% depending on what you use
3) THC may affect memory, focus, motivation, and decision making
4) Smoking/using marijuana may lower one’s IQ

To learn more, http://nyti.ms/1u6Ivjv

23
Dec

VT Counters Tobacco Companies’ Influence on Youth


How are tobacco companies targeting VT youth?